All posts by Bronson O'Quinn

Bronson O'Quinn is a writer, linguist, web developer, educator, and life-long student. His favorite movie is either Back to the Future or RoboCop. He prefers breakfast food. He writes novels and nonfiction articles about video game communities. He lives in Lexington, Kentucky with his artist wife and six (yes, 6) cats.

What’s Your Favorite Video Game?

I conducted an informal survey among attendees at the Kentucky Fried Zine Fest and among my Facebook friends. The question I asked was simple: what’s your favorite video game?

The responses were varied and insightful. Some people left one-word answers while others gave elaborate responses. I have compiled this into a printable zine that you can download here or from Issuu. Continue reading What’s Your Favorite Video Game?

Breitbart Leaks & the Terrorism of GamerGate

Joseph Bernstein’s article at Buzzfeed News—”Here’s How Breitbart And Milo Smuggled Nazi and White Nationalist Ideas Into The Mainstream“—includes larger implications for the video game community. Bernstein creates a narrative from a series of leaked emails from Breitbart which show Steve Bannon giving directions to Milo Yiannopoulis regarding their white nationalist agenda. They also “out” several male members of the press who were secretly giving Breitbart ideas for articles.

A couple weeks ago, I wrote an article that showed how Bannon had been grooming supporters from World of Warcraft forums way back in 2005. Bernstein’s article includes a bit where Breitbart editor Alex Marlow is editing one of Yiannopoulos’ speeches and approves a joke about “shekels” but asked to remove a joke about gas chambers. The article shows how Yiannopoulos would push the limits and the higher-ups would reign him in. At any point that he hinted at their racist, misogynist, or nationalist agenda, they would have him reword and rephrase certain excerpts.

The article is extremely long and detailed, and includes several examples of this sort of careful planning and manipulation. But the most interesting part for video game communities is how seemingly “good” guys were actually feeding the hate machine. Continue reading Breitbart Leaks & the Terrorism of GamerGate

You Can’t Separate Politics from Video Games

Last week’s discussions surrounding NFL players kneeling during the national anthem has many people saying the same thing: keep politics out of football. Some articles have risen stating that football has always been involved with politics. In fact, this is true of all arts and entertainment, and video games are no exception.

Video games often comes under fire because of their graphic violence and unique modes of interactivity that differ from other mediums. This article was written before the tragic shooting in Las Vegas this past weekend. However, we believe that by looking at two case studies specific to video games, we will be better equipped for this conversation later on down the road.

For today, we’re going to take a look at two recent developments that demonstrate how keeping politics separated from video games is impossible.

Continue reading You Can’t Separate Politics from Video Games

How Hate Speech & Video Games Created the Alt-Right

In 2005, Steve Bannon got Goldman Sachs to invest $60 million in a World of Warcraft Chinese gold farming company. 1 Bannon eventually took control of the gold farming company, Internet Gaming Entertainment. Even though IGE flopped, Bannon said that these gamers were the pre-cursor to the alt-right. “These guys, these rootless white males, had monster power… It was the pre-Reddit.”

In our previous two essays, we’ve looked at how video game communities develop hate speech as an intimidation tool and how online communities normalize hate speech so that it’s “no big deal”. This week, we’re looking at how those two ideas, when combined, created the Alt-Right. Continue reading How Hate Speech & Video Games Created the Alt-Right

  1. Snider, Mike. “Steve Bannon learned to harness troll army from ‘World of Warcraft’”. (18 Jul 2017). USA Today. Retrieved on 9 Sep 2017

Hate Speech in Online Communities

Last week, we examined how hate speech can be used as a way to intimidate and upset opponents. We looked at Felix “PewDiePie” Kjellberg’s use of the n-word as an example of how, even though he was playing a competitive video game, he wasn’t using it this way. It’s important to look at the reasons that people use hate speech because it demonstrates how ingrained it is into our lives. If someone is only using a word to intimidate someone, then we might be able to argue that they wouldn’t otherwise use that word. However, if a racial slur is the first expletive that someone says in a moment of frustration, then it’s most likely a word that occurs in their everyday speech.

This week’s essay looks at hate speech in online communities, especially how it becomes “the norm”. Continue reading Hate Speech in Online Communities

Hate Speech in Video Game Culture

Felix “PewDiePie” Kjellberg recently said the “n-word” on a stream of the popular online shooter Playunknown’s Battlegrounds.1 For those who follow Kjellberg’s “antics”, this is no surprise; earlier this year, he paid two men in India to record themselves holding up a sign that said “DEATH TO ALL JEWS”. In a half-hearted apology, he placed a lot of the blame on the Wall Street Journal for taking his “joke” out of context. 2 Unfortunately, this is far more representative of video game culture than we’d like to admit.

Kjellberg aside, online video games have festered with unpoliced hate speech ever since ther inception. Because Maze Rats is a fan of video games and a strong opponent of hate speech—in all its forms—we are presenting a three part series that looks at how hate speech is weaponized in video games, how it becomes normalized in online communities, and how disparate groups have intersected, ultimately leading to the rise of the alt-right.

At the bottom of each article, we are going to highlight an online community that pushes back against hate speech and creates a welcoming, mindful environment.

Hate Speech in Video Games

Because of the competitive nature of online video games, it becomes common practice to “smack talk” as a way to psychologically affect the other player. If you can piss off the enemy, then they won’t play as well. When someone is bad at smack talk, it’s easy to revert to saying whatever is most likely to piss them off. These tend to be sexist, homophobic, and racist slurs. After all, if it’s inappropriate in the real world, it’s probably going to be bad online, too.

A study in 2010 at UNC Chapel Hill found that people admitted to being more accepting of hate speech when used in a video game environment than in other contexts.3 Part of the reason hypothesized by the report is that games “fragment” users’ interactions with each other. While pseudonymous and anonymous message boards help to hide a person’s identity, video games have several moments in which the player’s interaction with other players is paused or ended. For example, when a map is loading and the player is sitting at a loading screen, they are generally not interacting with other players. Another example is when a player is navigating menus. Some games actually create interactivity during these breaks. The study argues that this distance makes the interactions feel less “real”, and therefore nurtures antisocial behavior.

The same team conducted another study where they surveyed actual gamers through Xbox Live voice chat. 4 Most of the interviewees “focused on the idea that anonymous gamers can say anything they like and face no consequences.” Aside from that, more competitive game modes were more likely to spark hate speech than cooperative game modes. As I mentioned previously, the competitive nature sparks aggressive speech, particularly hateful slurs. According to the study, “Most gamers thought hate speech was a way for people to distract opponents and get a competitive advantage.” A player named Johnnykom82 said, “Like in a sporting event, teams talk trash to each other.” DebatingBeeftek said hate speech is “a way to just piss another person off and get them distracted thinking about the comment instead of the game.”

Based on the current research, these sexist, homophobic, and racist slurs are generally used in online games to insult the enemy and get them “off their game”. What’s interesting is that Kjellberg’s slur was not used in this way because he had no voice chat connection to the enemy. What Kjellberg demonstrated was that hate speech is used for more reasons than just competitive intimidation.

I want to stress that I am not trying to “explain” hate speech as a way to “excuse” it. On the contrary: I want people to realize just how harmful it is, and how becoming “normal” is actually hurting the world around us. So keep in mind that, when looking at hate speech, it’s important to look at how people use it because, as we’ll see in the upcoming weeks, it’s not always used by the same people or for the same reasons.

In next week’s article, we’re going to take a look at how hate speech is used by online communities, particularly anonymous message boards like 4chan. Be forewarned: things are going to get a lot darker and a lot more problematic because the use of hate speech online has implications far beyond our virtual worlds.

Community Highlight: Waypoint

Maze Rats has written several articles about one of the newer journalistic gaming outlets, Waypoint. While it has roots from Vice Media’s previous gaming sections, the Waypoint brand was created after Austin Walker stepped in as Editor-in-Chief.

The team at Waypoint consists of rising star Austin Walker (who does a great job of connecting the academic world with the real world), industry veteran Patrick Klepek (who, despite being in the industry since EGM was owned by Ziff Davis, still gets carded at movie theaters), ex-Polygon Reviewer Danielle Riendeau (who is also an EMT and martial artist), previous Crunchyroll Brand Manager Danika Harrod, and long-time freelancer Rob Zacny.

When Vice launched a new platform for their websites earlier this year, they removed the ability to comment on specific articles. This follows a trend set last year when NPR closed off their comments and several other news organizations followed suit.56 As it turns out, allowing random comments doesn’t help people have a civil discourse or contribute much to the overall conversation.

As a way to create a moderated community, Waypoint created a forum earlier this year. 7 The Waypoint Forum Rules and Code of Conduct outline behavior, specifically stating that “Bigotry […] will not be tolerated”. The first rule goes on to say that it is not the job of marginalized people “to educate you”.

Since I have personally participated in their forums, I can also say that moderators will direct message you if one of your comments is problematic (whether intentionally or not) and they will ask you to reconsider your message. This sort of mindful interaction is exactly what helps build a community. More video game communities should look at Waypoint, and other communities like it, as an example.

  1. Ohlheiser, Abby. (12 SEP 2017). PewDiePie said the n-word on YouTube. The Internet’s most famous gamer is out of excuses. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 13 SEP 2017 from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2017/09/12/there-are-no-excuses-for-it-pewdiepie-apologizes-for-saying-the-n-word-in-a-youtube-livestream/?utm_term=.f5de8b789bd3
  2. Hernandez, Patricia. (16 FEB 2017). Pewdiepie Apologizes For ‘Death To All Jews’ Joke, Slams Wall Street Journal. Kotaku. Retrieved from https://kotaku.com/pewdiepie-apologizes-for-death-to-all-jews-joke-slams-1792439824
  3. Rogers, Ryan. “Video Game Design and Acceptance of Hate Speech in Online Gaming”. (2013). Race/Gender/Cass/Media. Publisher: Pearson. Editors: Lind, R.A. Print.
  4. Rogers, Ryan. (2012). The Virtual Locker Room: Perceptions of Hate Speech in Online Gaming. The Journal of New Media & Culture, Vol. 8, Iss. 1. Retrieved on 13 SEP 2017 from http://www.ibiblio.org/nmediac/summer2012/Articles/locker_room.html
  5. Jensen, Elizabeth.(17 AUG 2016). NPR Website To Get Rid Of Comments. NPR. Retrieved on 13 SEP 2017 from http://www.npr.org/sections/ombudsman/2016/08/17/489516952/npr-website-to-get-rid-of-comments
  6. Goujard, Clothilde. (08 SEP 2017). Why news websites are closing their comments sections. Global Editors Network on Medium. Retrieved on 13 SEP 2017 from https://medium.com/global-editors-network/why-news-websites-are-closing-their-comments-sections-ea31139c469d
  7. Harrod, Danika. (15 MAY 2017). We’re Having Too Much Fun in Waypoint’s New Forums. Waypoint. Retrieved on 13 SEP 2017 from https://waypoint.vice.com/en_us/article/pg7mkb/were-having-too-much-fun-in-waypoints-new-forums

Kentucky Fried Zine Fest 2017

This Saturday, I’ll be attending the Kentucky Fried Zine Fest for the second year in a row. I’ll be sharing a table with my wife, Malinda Jane O’Quinn. While I sell issues of The Backlog, my wife will be selling prints of her artwork (click here to check out her Instagram, and here to check out her Flickr page).

The Kentucky Fried Zine Fest in Lexington, Kentucky is in its fifth year. Originally the Ephemera Fest, the fest’s mission is “to showcase DIY zines, comics, book & paper arts, and the work of independent publishers, with an emphasis on zine creators from the Kentucky/Southern region.”

This year’s fest will be at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center. Continue reading Kentucky Fried Zine Fest 2017

Chernobyl’s Exclusion Zone

Cloth Map‘s Drew Scanlon explores Chernobyl’s Exclusion Zone through the eyes of video game interactions. He compares the real life experiences of a real life post-apocalyptic wasteland to scenes in games like S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl and The Last of Us.

A Strange Feeling

Hallway

Throughout the video, Scanlon tries to pinpoint why he feels strange, whether it’s the radiation or something else. “When we entered an apartment complex,” he says, “I couldn’t put my finger on why it felt so strange until I realized it’s odd to be walking through a large building and feel a breeze.”

Continue reading Chernobyl’s Exclusion Zone

Virtual Tour of California Extreme

Cloth Map released a 360 degree video of California Extreme, one of the United States’ largest arcade and pinball expositions. On a computer screen, you can click and drag the mouse in order to look in a 360 degree arc around the camera, as well as up or down. On a phone, you can move the phone to look around. The video also supports Google Cardboard.

Drew Scanlon, founder of Cloth Map, walks with Steve Lin, founding board member of the Video Game History Foundation. They look at various machines while Lin explains eye-catching videos.

Cloth Map is a video series that explores how games affect communities around the world. Scanlon announced in April that their first in-depth documentary would be about Ukraine. While the Ukraine gaming documentary has yet to be released, Scanlon did release a video about his experience in Ukraine at Eurovision.

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The Themes & “WTF?” of Metal Gear & Metal Gear 2

Quadruple Guess (The Themes)

Deception will become the most common theme throughout the series. Big Boss’ goal was to feed the US government bad information. Gray Fox becomes an enemy to Snake in MG2, hinting that he might have known Big Boss’s true intentions in the first game. So was he really kidnapped in the first game? Or was that all a part of Big Boss’s plan? So, if Big Boss’s plan was to confuse and deceive, then what if everything went according to plan? AHHHHHHHHHHH! From the very beginning, Metal Gear makes you second, triple, and quadruple guess everything you thought you know.

These games also introduce the idea of Science Fiction as an explanation for the unexplainable. In MG2, OILIX isn’t a magic alternative to oil: it’s algae! While “sci-fi explanations” are relatively realistic in this game, they will get crazier as the series continues. Continue reading The Themes & “WTF?” of Metal Gear & Metal Gear 2